Skip to main content

Millennials and the Law

Millennials or Generation Y are people who are born between 1980 and early 2000 so says Wikipedia (Not so trusty encyclopedia).  We get calls from young people regarding their debt problems.  Most of time we are able to help them but sometimes it is too late. It seems a bit of a overstatement but people should always open their mail (paper mail from the post office that is).  We want our clients to know that we still live in the world of paper. 

With all the advances in electronic communication and people dealing with their affairs online the courts are not that way yet. Since you are a millennial and need an explanation this is why.

1) Proof. If I send you a lawsuit over e-mail you will say that you did not get the e-mail. Oops it went to Spam.
2) The current people who are working the system are old just like me.

In any case, if you get a suspicious mail that says Court, Read it! If you get a certified mail pick it up. In New Jersey, for special civil part which are cases under 15k, service is last known address. The fact that you did not pick up the mail does not mean you were not served. The point of all this is don't lose your case because you did not read your mail. Pick it up call the court, file an answer or get an attorney. 

A little message for young lawyers out there don't cite Wikipedia as your authority source. You will lose your case. 

For more information about our firm or our services please visit us at www.ruizdoolanlaw.com.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are of general nature and not intended to be a substitute for legal advice or the formation of a lawyer-client relationship. In order to be properly represented, please contact your local professional. In addition, the information given on this web site has been composed by a New Jersey attorney practicing exclusively in New Jersey. None of the information contained herein should be deemed to apply in other states, nor should this website be construed as an attempt by the author to practice law in any state other than New Jersey. If you have any question regarding this website please contact our office directly at (201) 880-5563.
ADVERTISEMENT: This website contains attorney advertisement within the meaning of the Rules of Professional Conduct governing the practice of lawyers in the State of New Jersey.  This website is considered an “advertisement.” Before making your choice of an attorney, you should give this matter careful thought. The selection of an attorney is an important decision. If the representations made on this website are inaccurate or misleading, you may report this to the Committee on Attorney Advertising, Hughes Justice Complex, P.O. Box 037, Trenton, NJ 08625.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Establishing a Domestic Partnership for Estate Planning Purposes

Establishing a Domestic Partnership for Estate Planning Purposes For unmarried couples, it is important to have proper estate planning documents to have legal standing to each other. The Domestic Partnership Act established domestic partnerships for same sex and opposite sex (age 62 and older) nonrelated partners.  Couples 62 years an older that want to establish a Domestic partnership need to establish the following criteria: ·Share a common residence in New Jersey or in any other jurisdiction provided that at least one of the applicants is a member of a New Jersey State-administered retirement system;·Both persons are jointly responsible for each other’s common welfare as evidenced by joint financial arrangements or joint ownership of real or personal property;·Both persons agree to be jointly responsible for each other’s basic living expenses during the domestic partnership;· Neither applicant is in a marriage or civil union recognized by New Jersey law or a member of another domest…

Planning for Children in Case of Deportation

The current immigration climate is tense. Undocumented people fear not only for deportation but also for the care and wellbeing of their children.  It is important that people that are undocumented make plans in the event that this situation takes place. Among the first things to be planned is the provision of care and supervision of minor children while the parents are in the process of the deportation.

It is important to keep all detail information of the child. If the child is an American Citizen, having their passports updated should be a priority. In addition, it is often suggested to create a power of attorney limited to the event of deportation. In this power of attorney, the parents should assign a guardian to take care of the child and allow permission to travel with the guardian. The undocumented person should also consider leaving financial provisions for the care of the child.
It is often recommended that the undocumented person carries information of their attorney or a l…

Invalidating a Contract under the Doctrine of Economic Duress

The doctrine of economic duress has significantly developed and expanded, in recognition of the ever-increasing complexity of the business world. Claims of economic duress in business litigation are becoming more frequent. Several courts, including the United States Supreme Court, have acknowledged that there are situations under which financial pressure may cancel an otherwise enforceable contract. See 13 S. Williston, Contracts, § 1603 at 664 (3d ed. 1970); United States v. Bethlehem Steel Corp., 315 U.S. 289, 62 S.Ct. 581, 86 L.Ed. 855 (1942); Hartsville Oil Mill v. United States, 271 U.S. 43, 46 S.Ct. 389, 70 L.Ed. 822 (1926).The definition of economic duress is set forth in Williston:1. The party alleging economic duress must show that he has been the victim of a wrongful or unlawful act or threat, and2. Such act or threat must be one which deprives the victim of his unfettered will. [13 Williston, supra, § 1617 at 704 (footnotes omitted)]

The courts in New Jersey have defined eco…